Changarreando Instagram Live + Q&A with Artist Gaby Magaly

Oct. 28

Oct. 28 @ 5:00 pm 5:45 pm

You’re invited to Mexic-Arte Museum’s Changarreando Instagram Live event with Artist Gaby Magaly on Thursday, October 28th from 5:00 pm – 5:45 pm CST taking place virtually through the Museum’s Instagram account @mexic_arte! Mario Villanueva, Mexic-Arte Museum’s Marketing and Events Associate, will facilitate the virtual event with a series of questions directed at the artist including a Q&A taking place during the last 20 minutes of the event. 

Artwork: Gabi Magaly, Cuando crees en ti misma te ves más bonita, Archival Pigment Print, 33” x 44”, 2020

About the Artist: 

Gabi Magaly is an emerging artist born in Bryan, Texas. Magaly received her BFA in photography at Sam Houston State University in 2015 and received her MFA in Visual Arts at the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2020. Magaly has exhibited in solo shows at Satellite Gallery, Huntsville, TX; The Brick, San Antonio, TX; Presa House Gallery, San Antonio, TX; Casa Lu, Mexico City. Her numerous group exhibitions include at Luis Leu Gallery, Karlsruhe, Germany; The Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, San Antonio, TX; Masur Museum in Monroe, Louisiana; Museo De Las Américas in Dever, Colorado; She’s been awarded two CAMMIE awards from Blue Star Contemporary and Luminaria Contemporary Cultural Center during Contemporary Art Month 2020. She works predominantly in the medium of photography, but also employs other mediums like sculptural installation and embroidery. Magaly currently lives in San Antonio, Texas and works remotely at Diné College in Tsaile, Arizona

Artist Statement 

“Growing up in a Mexican-American household, my childhood was saturated with the machismo and marianismo culture. Hypermasculinity oozes brutality, control, and bad cologne. Placated and tongue-biting women don’t speak up, act up, and always have rice and tortillas on the table at precisely six o’clock. Daughters are raised to submit to men, and are being taught to fetishize purity and holiness. We are expected to feed stomachs, ego, and a taste for violence. With my work, I draw from my experience within this toxic culture and provide a call to action for the women who don’t have a voice to feel empowered and for the men with a little too much to say to be softened. The imagery I use within my work is: Fiesta spices, Fideo, prayer cards, candles, blankets, and tortillas. I want these items to be culturally and physically accessible. A visual language usually reserved for Abuela’s kitchen and living room is transformed into defiance, empowerment, and hopefully change.”