EXHIBITIONS

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ILLUSTRATING ANARCHY AND REVOLUTION 1.25.14-2.28.14


Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution evolved from a partnership between the La Casa de El Hijo del Ahuizote Museum and The University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS) academic conference “Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution: Mexican Legacies of Global Change.” This survey exhibition extends the conference’s thematic analysis of Mexico’s Flores Magón brothers’ anarchist legacies and presents associated sociopolitical art and ephemera referencing social, agrarian, and labor movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. The displayed works range from Mexican anarchist newspapers to conceptual installations, and although they reflect disparate objectives, the efficacy of each creation’s notions of inequality, displacement, and resistance traverse the parameters set by historiography. Original forms of many of the exhibition’s objects are as seemingly informal information, acting as a facilitating tool for mass distribution between activists and the general public in the Americas. Within many of the contemporary creations there are consistent appropriations vis–à–vis images and philosophies of the past resulting in an assumed ideological legacy for current movements. llustrating Anarchy and Revolution aims to highlight the rebellious history of creation and exhibit an iconic defiance that continues to this day.

Featured Artists include: Jesus Barraza, Nao Bustamante, Sam Durant, Eric J. Garcia, Astrid Hadad, Ester Hernandez, Julio Salgado, Ernesto Yerena Montejano, Las Cafeteras and works from the Mexic-Arte Museum Permanent Collection.

In conjunction with Illustrating Anarchy and Revolution, Mexic-Arte Museum co-curated the exhibition Fantastic & Grotesque: José Clemente Orozco in Print at the Benson Latin American Library. More information available here.

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CREATING LA MUERTE: JOSE GUADALUPE POSADA 100TH ANNIVERSARY 9.20.13-11.24.13


The Mexic–Arte Museum will celebrate the 100 year anniversary of Jose Guadalupe Posada (1852–1913). One of Mexico's most famous political cartoonists and illustrators, Jose Guadalupe Posada created legendary calaveras (skeleton) figures and the popular la catrina (elegant skeleton) image largely associated with the Latin American holiday of Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Original Posada broadsides from the Mexic–Arte Museum permanent collection and commemorative Posada video installations from Mexico's Museo Nacional de Arte (MUNAL) will be on display in this commemorative exhibition.

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COMMUNITY ALTARS 9.20.13-11.24.13


The Community Altars exhibition will display local artists, school groups, and activists revisiting their family members, friends, and loved ones who have passed. El Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) heralds the returning of the dead to Earth during November 1 and 2. To help facilitate the return family members and loved ones create unique offerings consisting of the deceased's favorite foods, drinks, and memorabilia honoring their life. Traditionally, altars are in private spaces such as grave sites and homes, however with the popularization of the Day of the Dead holiday the altar–making process has become an artistic expression as well as a pedagogical tool for Latino cultural awareness. The artistic creation and display of these public altars helps facilitate an interpretative reflection about life, death, memory, and loss and extends an invitation to the community to be a part of this process and experience. A special explanatory altar will be created to recognize and honor Jose Guadalupe Posada created by the Mexic–Arte Museum.

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MIX ‘N MASH 12.2.13-1.13.14


The Mix 'N Mash annual exhibition and art sale features original, donated works of art created by local, national, and international artists. Each artistic contribution is available for purchase, and all proceeds benefit the Mexic-Arte Museum's education and exhibition programming.

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Tita Griesbach, Malinche I, 1994, hand–painted lithograph, 24" x 36"

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Selections from the Tita Griesbach Collection 12.2.13-1.13.14


Tita Griesbach is a Mexican painter and printmaker currently residing in Los Angeles after forty years in Austin. She donated her personal collections to the Mexic–Arte Museum in 2012. Her art works primarily consist of neo–figurative compositions reflecting on myth, legends of Mexico, and personal fantasies. The selections from Griesbach’s collection highlight abstract, figurative experiences, and the artist’s ability to create nostalgia for a history that acts as both illusion and fact.

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Our Lady of Guadalupe School ca. 1920s

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Austin’s Mexico–A Forgotten Neighborhood 10.30.12-3.10.13


Austin’s “Mexico”: A Forgotten Downtown Neighborhood, showcases the culturally significant Mexican American community in downtown Austin through the Austin History Center's Photograph Collection. Presented by the Austin History Center & the Mexic-Arte Museum

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Community Altars 9.20.12-11.25.12


As part of the Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) holiday and celebration (November 1–2), practitioners create ornate altars that typically consist of cempasuchitl (marigolds), foodstuffs, and memorabilia commemorating a deceased individual. Community Altars represents the fluidity of this practice and unveils dedicatory altars by Austin community members to not only past friends and family but also cultural influencers, community leaders, unknown victims of border violence, and personal role models.

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Santo en el museo de cera, movie poster, 1963, Agrasánchez Collection of Mexican Cinema from the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection

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Unmasked: Lucha Libre
01.25.13-05.25.13


In the Mexic-Arte Museum’s annex gallery, Unmasked: Lucha Libre presents examples of the masked tradition of Mexican wrestling sport and its infusion in popular culture and contemporary art. Unmasked: Lucha Libre showcases Mexican wrestling masks, vintage Mexican Cinema posters and movies, and contemporary Latino prints and video documentaries.

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Vincent Valdez, Duerme (Sleep) detail, 2011, ink and paper, 42"x72"

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Elements of Death 9.20.12-11.25.12


In honor of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) holiday, Elements of Death presents contemporary, multimedia artworks reflecting on death and the emotional experiences of memory, nostalgia, pain, and loss.

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Poli Marichal, El Bosque Dentro–The Forest Within, Serigraph, 2012

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Serie Print Project XIX 7.20.12-9.9.12


As the official archive of the Serie Print Collection, the Mexic-Arte Museum annually exhibits the newest serigraph prints from the Serie Project. Each year, the Serie Project selects 10 to 18 artists through a juror system and invites them to participate in its artist-in-residence program.

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Young Latino Artists Exhibition 17: Grafficanos 7.20.12-9.9.12


The seventeenth edition of the Young Latino Artists Exhibition, Grafficanos, will feature selections curated by visual artist James Huizar. Selected pieces present Latino artwork influenced by the graffiti art genre and focus on the integration of popular culture between the United States and Mexico.

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Kevin Muñoz next to Changarrito

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Kevin Muñoz: Changarrito


Changarrito is a contemporary artistic trend rooted in Mexico’s ancient market tradition. This mobile art cart phenomenon is the brain child of artist Máximo González; his interest in “informal commerce” evolved into the creation of an alternative to the formal gallery space. Changarrito carts circulate throughout the world, each with the objective of promoting original artwork to the public. Kevin Muñoz is an artist and designer who resides in East Austin.

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Miguel Aragón, Retratos de la violencia/Portraits of Violence, 2012

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Miguel Aragón: Fractured Memories, Assembled Trauma 4.13.12-7.8.12


Mexic-Arte Museum presents new works by Miguel Aragón. Originally from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, Aragón is an MFA graduate student at The University of Texas at Austin specializing in printmaking. Through a conceptual framework of trauma and reduction, Aragón’s current series chronicles the ongoing drug-related violence in Mexico.

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Arturo Garcia Bustos, Emiliano Zapata, 1947, Linoleum 19x25.5"

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Arturo García Bustos: La imagen del México postrevolucionario 4.13.12-7.8.12


Mexic–Arte Museum presents the revolutionary artworks of master printmaker, Arturo García Bustos. The selected prints unveil decades of carefully crafted social commentary chronicling the political struggles within Mexico and abroad.

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Ricardo Paniagua, Unknown Sources, 2012, lacquer on magnetic wood and veneer panels on steel

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Young Latino Artists 18: Con/Juntos
06.07.13-09.08.13


The Young Latino Artists (YLA) exhibition has historically provided Latino artists under the age of thirty-five with professional-level museum experience and exposure. In 1996, the inception of the Young Latino Artists Exhibition resulted in one of the most highly anticipated annual traditions for the Mexic-Arte Museum. Now in its eighteenth year, the current YLA exhibition Con/Juntos will be guest curated by visual artist Michael Anthony Garcia; the title, which means "With/Together," reinforces the importance of the joining of ideas and of individuals with a common cause, while also referencing the idea of conjuntos, a group of musicians collaborating and unifying their talents to create beautiful music for the public to share. Selected artists include: Raul Gonzalez, Daniel Adame, Sergio Garcia, Ricardo Paniagua, Robert Jackson Harrington, Isabella Bur, April Garcia, Nelda Ramos, Javier Vanegas, Colectivo Sector Reforma (Javier Cárdenas Tavizon, Santino Escatel, and Alejandro Fournier), and Tejidos Urbanos.

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Devil Mask (Michoacán, Mexico), Mexic-Arte Museum Permanent Collection

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Masked: Changing Identities
01.25.13-05.25.13


Masked: Changing Identities showcases Mexican dance and popular masks from the Mexic-Arte Museum permanent collection. Each selected mask’s vibrant colors and designs reflect Mexican traditions of indigenous craftsmanship, mythic narratives, and dance rituals. Masked deconstructs the concept of the “mask” as transformative tool for disguise, performance, and entertainment in Mexican visual culture.The selected folkloric masks from Western Mexico including the states of Guerrero and Michoacan, range from authentic wood, leather and metal masks used ceremonially, sold commercially, and created as limited edition art objects.

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Death to Dollars 10.7.11-11.13.11


Death to Dollars addresses the commercialization of the Day of the Dead—a holiday traditionally associated with Mexican folklore, pre-Columbian spirituality, and Catholicism. This exhibit looks to Day of the Dead iconography as it has been recalibrated to suit commercial markets and examines how the commoditization of Mexican and Mexican American heritage is reshaping this emblematic holiday.

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Mix ‘n’ Mash 12.2.11-1.3.12


Mix ‘n’ Mash is an annual exhibition and art sale featuring local and statewide artists. Each artist receives one blank 12” by 12” Gessobord, generously donated by Ampersand. Artists create original pieces that vary in media and content. These artistic contributions are available for purchase and all proceeds will benefit Mexic-Arte Museum’s exhibitions and educational programming. Click Here to purchase tickets.

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Totally Cool Totally Art 2.14.12-2.28.12


This exhibit is held annually to celebrate and encourage artistic production among Austin’s teen community. Mexic-Arte Museum has partnered with the City of Austin to bring artwork created by teens in after-school workshops into Mexic-Arte’s gallery space. Exhibited artists produce high-quality work in media such as photography, illustration, mixed media and video.

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31K Portraits for Peace 1.27.12-4.1.12


31K’s large-scale, vivid photographs portray artist Diego Huerta’s vision of the breadth of lives lost and the hope for peace that still remains in Mexico. The ironic part of this photographic journey is that while each sitter represents a drug-related death, the persons depicted in each photo emit an overwhelming positivity. The images do not capture a solemn, somber nation mourning its tragedies but instead a people that evoke resiliency and triumph. Follow Diego Huerta’s 31K Project on the official website www.31kproject.com and on facebook.com/retratosporlapaz.

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